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NATIVE VOICES LECTURE SERIES

 

NATIVE VOICES LECTURE SERIES AND RELATED EVENTS

This series of lectures, discussions and related events is being presented in conjunction with the National Library of Medicine’s (NLM’s) traveling exhibit, Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness, which is on display at the Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library at the University of Utah.  More information: Native Voices Exhibit, Art Gallery, and Ceremonies.

Special appreciation is due to the Office of the Associate Vice President for Health Equity and Inclusion, University of Utah Health Sciences and the American Indian Resource Center, University of Utah for guidance and support in planning and publicizing the events for this exhibit.  

Bring your own lunch for the sessions scheduled at NOON.  For lectures that have already been presented, check out the EHSL YouTube Channel.

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UPCOMING LECTURES/DISCUSSIONS/EVENTS

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Friday, October 23, 2015, NOON-1:00PM, History of Medicine Room, Upper Level, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library

Indigenous Ways of Knowing and the Provision of Health Care

Dolores Calderon, J.D., Ph.D.,  Assistant Professor, Education, Culture, and Society, College of Education, and Assistant Professor, Ethnic Studies Program, University of Utah

This presentation will explore the question: how do indigenous knowledges and subsequent cultural protocols inform the doctor/patient relationship? Secondarily, the presenter will discuss a Cultural Respect Framework in the delivery of healthcare to Indigenous communities as a tool for healthcare providers.

Dr. Dolores Calderon was born and raised in the Lower Valley of El Paso, Texas, where her family (Mexican and Tigua) remain to this day. Her research focuses on Indigenous education, Culturally Relevant/Multicultural education, Chicana(o)/Indigenous Student Success, and Anti-Colonial/Critical Race theories.  She is PI of, The Role of Home in Chicano/Indigenous Student Success, a research project documenting the educational trajectories of Chicana/o and Indigenous student graduates from highly selective ivies and sister ivies in order to map out what culturally relevant success looks like and make policy recommendations for interested stakeholders.

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Monday, November 2, 2015, NOON-1:00PM, History of Medicine Room, Upper Level, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library 

The Medicine Wheel and Mental Health

Beverly Patchell (Cherokee), PhD, RN, CNS, PMH-BC, Assistant Professor, Psych/Mental Health MS DNP Program, College of Nursing, University of Utah

This presentation will address the traditional ways mental health has been established and maintained by Native Americans.  It will address the history of mental illness in Indian Country and its correlations to US policies of termination and assimilation. It will look at how the mind-body-spirit movement in healthcare is bringing balance back to the traditions and science of mental health for Native Americans.

Dr. Beverly Patchell is a member of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma and also Muscogee Creek.  She is an Assistant Professor of Nursing in the Psych/Mental Health Doctor of Nursing Practice Program at the College of Nursing.  Research interests include interpersonal and domestic violence, substance abuse, cancer and diabetes (with a focus on mental health issues); current active research is in domestic violence prevention.

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Tuesday, November 3, 2015, 5:30-7:00PM, 1st Floor, Research Administration Building

Native Voices Evening Medical Ethics Discussion

Discussion Leader:  Phyllis Pettit Nassi (Otoe/Cherokee), MSW, Native American Outreach Program, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah

Phyllis Pettit Nassi, MSW, Manager, Special Populations and Native American Outreach at Huntsman Cancer Institute, has traveled extensively throughout the United States, Alaska, Canada and Australia to educate her Indian brothers and sisters and researchers working with Indigenous people about the importance of risk reduction, early detection, participation in clinical trials, and cancer research, and understanding the future, for example, of targeted therapies, pharmacogenomics, and immunotherapy.  Ms. Nassi was born in Oklahoma, is enrolled in the Otoe Missouri Tribe, Bear Clan, and is a member of the Cherokee nation, Red Bird Clan. Raised on the Navajo, Hopi, and Zuni reservations, she also works with research teams and national associations that advocate for recognition of the importance of researchers and their staff to understand tribal cultures and “how complicated it’s going to be to get it right, and how difficult it will be for every researcher working with the tribes, if they get it wrong.” She is a graduate of the University of Utah, College of Social Work, where she earned a Masters in Social Work and pursued a PhD.

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Wednesday, November 4, 2015, NOON-1:00PM, Main Level, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library

Traditional Native American Blessing Ceremony

Rupert Steele (Confederated Tribes of the Goshute), Traditional Elder

As the Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness Exhibit comes to a close and continues its travels to other Libraries, Health Sciences Centers and Communities, we will celebrate its success and bless its continuing journey.

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Thursday, November 5, 2015, NOON-1:00PM, History of Medicine Room, Upper Level, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library 

Health Disparities in Native Populations: Closing the Gap

Lillian Tom-Orme (Diné), Ph.D., MPH, RN, FAAN, Research Assistant Professor, Division of Epidemiology, School of Medicine

This presentation will discuss the various health disparities and their related social determinants of health in American Indian and Alaska Native populations and suggest ways to reduce/close the gap.

Dr. Lillian Tom-Orme’s research interests include health disparity issues, transcultural health, and cancer and diabetes care in Native Americans. She currently has membership in the American Public Health Association, American Diabetes Association, Network for Cancer Researchers among American Indian and Alaska Native Populations, National Coalition of Ethnic Minority Nurses Associations, National Alaska Native and American Indian Nurses Association, and Transcultural Nursing Society. She has served on the Minority Women’s Health Panel of Experts (DHHS) and the Advisory Board for the National Institute of Minority Health Disparities and as Native American Research Liaison for the National Cancer Institute. She is a co-Founder of the Native Research Network and currently serves as co-Chair.

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RELATED PRESENTATION:

Thursday, November 12, 2015, NOON-1:00PM, Location: HSEB 2110

Patient Voices: Focus on Native American Health

Charles James Nabors, Ph.D. Conference, Patient Voices: a Series on Health Care Quality through the Eyes of the Patient.   Sponsored by the Office of Health Equity and Inclusion. 

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ARCHIVED LECTURES

Tuesday September 15, 2015      YouTube Video

Aspen Trees and Toothaches: Pre-Columbian Healing Practices of North American Indian Indigenous Peoples

Franci Lynne Taylor (Choctaw), Director, American Indian Resource Center, Office for Student Equity and Diversity, University of Utah

Native Peoples of the Americas had a vast knowledge and understanding of the plants and other ways of healing that had served them for millennium, until new diseases were introduced due to colonization.  This presentation will examine some of these practices and botanical medicines utilized before first contact.

Franci Lynne Taylor is the Director of the American Indian Resource Center at the University of Utah.  She specializes in traditional Indigenous knowledge and ethnobotany and is a participating member of the Indigenous People’s working group at the United Nations. She has taught classes on interactions between colonialism and indigenous peoples at the University of Brussels, Belgium. Ms. Taylor is a member of the Choctaw Tribe and is a traditional dancer and craft worker.

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Wednesday, October 14, 2015      YouTube Video

Cancer in Indian Country, HCI Native American Outreach

Phyllis Pettit Nassi (Otoe/Cherokee), MSW, and Lynne Hall (Klamath/Warm Springs), MSW, Native American Outreach Program, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah

Cancer is a difficult disease to talk about in any culture. In the American Indian/Alaska Native cultures it is even more challenging. Native American Outreach (NAO) shares its experience.

Phyllis Pettit Nassi, MSW, Manager, Special Populations and Native American Outreach at Huntsman Cancer Institute, has traveled extensively throughout the United States, Alaska, Canada and Australia to educate her Indian brothers and sisters and researchers working with Indigenous people about the importance of risk reduction, early detection, participation in clinical trials, and cancer research, and understanding the future, for example, of targeted therapies, pharmacogenomics, and immunotherapy.  Ms. Nassi was born in Oklahoma, is enrolled in the Otoe Missouri Tribe, Bear Clan, and is a member of the Cherokee nation, Red Bird Clan. Raised on the Navajo, Hopi, and Zuni reservations, she also works with research teams and national associations that advocate for recognition of the importance of researchers and their staff to understand tribal cultures and “how complicated it’s going to be to get it right, and how difficult it will be for every researcher working with the tribes, if they get it wrong.” She is a graduate of the University of Utah, College of Social Work, where she earned a Masters in Social Work and pursued a PhD.

Lynne Hall, MSW, is Administrative Program Coordinator for Native American Outreach, Special Populations at Huntsman Cancer Institute. She is an enrolled member of the Klamath Tribes and is a descendant of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs. She received her Bachelors of Science degree in Health Sciences and her Master’s degree in Social Work. For the past 12 years Lynne has assisted Phyllis Nassi, Manager of Native American Outreach Special Populations, in the implementation of outreach initiatives, to providing culturally sensitive cancer education, prevention and screening information to underserved populations. She has experience in working with American Indians/Alaska Natives and has traveled to many tribal reservations.

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